Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Troy Union RR NYC, D&H, B&M

Monday, October 28, 2013

Tom Trencansky's FJ&G

In the Spring of 1973, Railfan Tom Trencansky visited the FJ&G in Gloversville and chased them a short way to Johnstown...



Here is S-2 Number 21 grabbing Caboose Number 3 from the West Yard in Gloversville


Number 21 getting ready to put her train together for the run South


Gloversville Yard


Our small consist heads South past the Hill Street Crossing.



 Southward approaching North Perry Street in Johnstown near the former Ireland Chemical Company.



Looks like the 21 is doing some switching in Johnstown.  Perhaps adding to the Southbound?

Monday, September 16, 2013

Here Comes The Leviathan!!!!


PHOTO: William Kozel

 Steam Returns To The Adirondacks

Central Pacific #63, The Leviathan Came To Town For The Weekend Of The 14th.  Here Are Some Shots Of The Famous Reproduction In Action.


PHOTO: Bradley Peterson Jr.

A Steam engine probably hasn't been seen on the Hudson River in over 60 years.  The Number 63 is seen crossing The Hudson River at MP-NC9 on The Sanford Lake Branch for a test run.  An engine was schedule to run to Newcomb for their Town's Teddy Roosevelt Day, and as a surprise, it was the Famous Leviathan!  The train went as far as MP NC 22.6.
PHOTO: Bradley Peterson Jr.


PHOTO: Kloke Locomotive Works http://leviathan63.com/ Used By Permission

Here's the Eastward View from The Hudson River Bridge.


PHOTO: Bradley Peterson Jr.

Here's the Leviathan deep in the woods on the Sanford Lake Spur!


PHOTO: Bradley Peterson Jr.
Brad Peterson had the pleasure of turning The Leviathan on the table at North Creek.

PHOTO: Bradley Peterson Jr.

Here's the newly painted coach, General Joseph Warren at North Creek on the 12th of September.

PHOTO: Bradley Peterson Jr.
The 8524 and the 63 sit at the North Creek Station.

PHOTO: Bradley Peterson Jr.

Here comes the 52 as an extra from Saratoga Springs

PHOTO: Dave Pfeiffer
Just what the people have been waiting for.  Dave Pfeiffer caught a great glimpse of the #63 crossing the Sacandaga River  at Hadley.
PHOTO: Dave Pfeiffer
Steaming along just North of Thurman Station


PHOTO: Dave Pfeiffer

Riparius Station

PHOTO: Dave Pfeiffer
A crowd gathers on the platform at North Creek to take a quick photo!

PHOTO: Dave Pfeiffer

North Creek
PHOTO: Greg Klingler

What an amazing shot Greg Klingler captured of the bridge at North Creek!  The steam is wonderful!

PHOTO: Greg Klingler


The contrast between the smoke and white clouds is incredible!

PHOTO: Greg Klingler
Here's a crystal clear shot of the Number 63 at Thurman.

Friday, September 13, 2013

The D&H Lake George Branch and Glen Lake Too!


Steam Railroads and Electric Streetcars On their way to the Queen of Adirondack Lakes...

Originally part of the Glens Falls Railroad, the Caldwell Branch was completed from Glens Falls to Lake George on May 29th, 1882.  Here's a trip to the lake and a stop to see a local family with a history of work on The Hudson Valley Railway...


(Courtesy Warren County Historical Society)
The first Lake George Depot and D&H passenger train arriving in the early 1900's.  This station was demolished in 1911.  The site of the former Gaslight Village would later occupy the land to the right.

PHOTO: Joe Papushnik Collection
This is the second Lake George Depot.  This replaced the original in 1911.

PHOTO: Joe Papushnik Collection
Here is the rebuilt Fort William Henry Hotel.  A popular destination also built in 1911 by The Hudson Valley Electric Railway which was controlled by the Delaware and Hudson.  Before this, a larger Fort William Henry Hotel stood here, built in 1855 and burned in 1909.  The newest incarnation of the Hotel is actually the third, but parts of this building remain after it was demolished in 1969.

PHOTO: Joe Papushnik Collection

The popular Lake George Steamboat Company has been a staple of Lake George for over 100 years and was founded by the Delaware And Hudson Canal and Railroad.  The railroad to Caldwell brought people by train to a cruise on the beautiful lake...

PHOTO: Joseph A. Smith/Ken Bradford Collection
D&H Camelback at The Lake George Station.

PHOTO: Joseph A. Smith/Ken Bradford Collection

Another Camelback and the Water Tower at Lake George.

PHOTO: Joseph A. Smith/Ken Bradford Collection
You would have passed Glen Lake on your way to Lake George.  This train almost made it there after the line was open in 1882, but may have taken the curve too quick.  This curve on Glen Lake was the scene of several accidents.  One which left boxcars at the bottom of the lake for years.  Their remains have since been removed.  Notice the baggage and parcels on the overturned coach.

Photographer: 1948 Charles E. Aubrey, Phil Aubrey Collection
Here's a passenger train on the way to Lake George in 1948 from the the location as above.  This time they are successfully negotiating the curve.  This photo was taken from a bridge that used to bring visitors down to the Lake.  The Hudson Valley Trolley line passed this spot right above this hill.  The photographer of this photo's name was Charles E. Aubrey.  Charles' father and uncle were motormen on the Hudson Valley Railway and grew up in nearby Queensbury, near the Queensbury Car Barn. 

Photographer: 1948 Charles E. Aubrey, Phil Aubrey Collection
Charles follows the train as it passes below him on it's way to it's final destination.  Charles' son, Phil Aubrey, made the trip on the final passenger train to Lake George in November on 1957
Photographer: 1948 Charles E. Aubrey, Phil Aubrey Collection
Photographer: 1948 Charles E. Aubrey, Phil Aubrey Collection

Phil Aubrey Collection
Here is the camp of Charles Aubrey on scenic Glen Lake.

Phil Aubrey Collection
Closer inspection shows us two Hudson Valley Railway Marker Lamps used to light the outside of the camp.

Phil Aubrey Collection
Here's a closer view of the marker lamps on the camp.  Don't rush up there since the lamps are long gone.

Phil Aubrey Collection
Here's a company photo of a young Archibald Aubrey.  Archibald is Charles' father and Phil's grandfather.  Archie worked on a trolley for 20 years until the electric line closed in 1928.  Read this neat article about Archie's retirement and subsequent, re-hire...

From the Glens Falls Post Star 1929


ARCHIE AUBREY BACK ON THE JOB
The old saying, "Once a railroad man, always a railroad man." is borne out in the case of Archie Aubrey.
When the trolley service ended December 1, Mr. Aubrey took a position in the Imperial Wall Paper company's
plant, but after spending twenty years as a trolley conductor he found a job in a mill not to his liking, so he is back in the service as a bus operator for the Hudson Transportation company.


Phil Aubrey Collection
Here is an older Archibald with his trolley and a Superintendent of the line in Fort Edward.

Phil Aubrey Collection


Here is the badge from Archibald's Conductor Hat

Phil Aubrey Collection

Here is a Union -Ribbon that Archibald wore on his uniforms for Parades and other special occasions.


As mentioned earlier, Archibald's brother Edgar was also an employee of The Hudson Valley Railway.  It was Edgar who got his brother a job on the HV.  Edgar died in a horrific crash at Fort Miller in September of 1908. His new wife would bring a lawsuit against the Railway and receive a reward a few years later...

Phil Aubrey Collection

Here is a ribbon that Archibald wore proudly considering the sad circumstances of his brother Edgar's unfortunate accident.  This ribbon was issued by the the Electric Railway Union called The Amalgamated Association of Street and Electric Railway Employees of America and it honored it's members that had passed on...



Here is a photo of the horrific crash near Fort Miller from the book "Saratoga Through Car, A History Of The Hudson Valley Railway" by David F. Nestle.

PHOTO: Joseph A. Smith/Ken Bradford Collection


Here is a sad day for the Hudson Valley Railway.  It's the last day of the Fort Edward Branch in the Summer of 1928.  Number 71 is seen on Broadway in Fort Edward in front of St. Joseph's Catholic Church riding behind a horse car that was used in the Lumber District of The United Traction Company of Albany.  Another possession of The Delaware And Hudson Railroad.

Special thanks to The Aubrey Family for sharing their photos and memories....

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

West Shore Railroad Bridge, Fort Plain, NY

A bridge on the former West Shore Railroad in Fort Plain, NY had her footings undermined by the flood of June 27th.  The bridge has been hanging dangerously over The Otsquago Creek, but officials have said that it will be put back in place.  The bridge is part of the Erie Canal Bike Trail in the Mohawk Valley.


All Photos By Charlie Vosburg...





Thanks Charlie!